The Future of Pan Africanism

The Future of Pan Africanism

By Nigel Stewert 18th November, 2019

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Abstract

When the missionaries, anthropologists and explorers first came to Africa, their mandate was to Christianise, civilise, and commercialise – three Cs. There’s no question that we’re in a unique time in history, a time where our future will be the degree in which we can harness and shape this global awakening and resistance into a program of sustainable change. However, what does the vision and road map of a Pan Africanism which is fit for the 21st Century actually look like?

About author

Nigel is a passionate social entrepreneur, pan africanist and teacher. He is Founder & CEO of The Centre, a growing community of scholars and intellects who collaborate to produce educational content for the African Diaspora.

A Scientific Argument for Ancestral Memory

A Scientific Argument for Ancestral Memory

By Vistra Greenaway-Harvey 18th November, 2019

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Abstract

That ‘ancestors’ bear great significance in the lives of their African descendants is evident throughout African anthropology and theology. They are deemed to be, “patrons of society” that hold incredible power over human destiny. It is through venerating both sides that African descendants can avoid misfortune in life. However, what does the science say? Can we actually back this up with genetic evidence and present an underlying basis for exploring phenomenoa’s such as PTSS and intergenerational trauma? In this fascinating piece, our author explores those arguments that suggeat we can.

About author

Vistra Greenaway-Harvey is an academic copywriter and legal researcher. As well as African commentary, she drafts consultations and legal submissions for local councils and Fortune 500 companies.

Centering Black Scholorship

Centering Black Scholarship

By Vistra Greenaway-Harvey 18th November, 2019

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Abstract

Black Scholarship in this insightful paper the author firmly rejects the assertion that Pan-Africanism is dead. Yes it is fair to say that some African leaders have not engendered solidarity on the continent. Likewise, the African Union may have departed from their founding fathers’ aims of unity. However Greenaway-Harvey argues against the ideas that draw us into referring to the political failings of continental leaders and the assertion that Pan-Africanism is now perceived to be “much more a cultural and social philosophy than the politically driven movement; to the evidence that it has always been so and indeed a very important process to undertake as Pan-African community leader.

About author

Vistra Greenaway-Harvey is an academic copywriter and legal researcher. As well as African commentary, she drafts consultations and legal submissions for local councils and Fortune 500 companies.